The James Webb Space Telescope Is Assembled! Finally! | SciShow News

The James Webb Space Telescope Is Assembled! Finally! | SciShow News


[INTRO ♪] For years, NASA has been working on an amazing telescope. It’s called the James Webb Space Telescope, or JWST, and at one point, it was intended to launch in 2007. We’ve been talking about this project since SciShow started, because James Webb could transform our understanding of the universe. But honestly, being a fan of this telescope is sometimes hard work. After years of seeing it fail tests and get
postponed, things can feel discouraging. Today, though, I have some good news! Last week, after more than a decade of delays, the two halves of the telescope have finally been joined together. Although it won’t do identical work, James Webb is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, which will likely stop working in the mid-2020s. And once Webb launches, it will be charged with a full complement
of missions. Using infrared light, it will study the composition of exoplanets, probe the oldest galaxies we can see, and maybe even answer our questions about what the universe is made of. But before it can do any of that, it needs to launch. And before it can launch, it needs to be fully tested. Until recently, Webb’s two main halves were tested separately. But now, we can test them together. One half consists of the telescope itself. That’s the part with gold-coated mirrors and a suite of instruments. The other half has the spacecraft, which will steer the telescope, along with the giant, five-layer sunshield that will block light from the Sun, Earth,
and Moon. Blocking this light will help keep the telescope
cold — which is a must, since heat is a major source of infrared radiation. So, if it’s not cold enough, an infrared telescope’s own heat can overwhelm its instruments while it’s trying to monitor distant, dim
objects. The sunshield will solve a lot of that problem, but the telescope will also have a bit of
cold helium to keep some of its instruments extra chilly. Of course, just because the telescope is mostly-assembled doesn’t mean it’s ready for launch. Engineers still have to connect the electronics between the two halves, and after that, they have to test them all
together. They’ll have to make sure they wired everything correctly and that the equipment will survive deployment and the vacuum of
space. That means there’s still room for error. But hopefully, things will go well, and the telescope will finally launch in March
2021. Thankfully, even if Webb doesn’t launch
for a while, there’s plenty of other work to do in astronomy. For example, researchers are still hunting for the first solid evidence of an exomoon — a moon orbiting a planet outside the solar system. Moons are usually much smaller than their planets, so even when we find an exomoon candidate, it’s tricky to isolate the signal and confirm that it’s actually there. One team of astronomers thinks there’s a way around this, though. Their paper has been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal. And in it, they propose you can find certain exomoons by studying their planet’s
chemistry. And using this method, they’ve even found an especially exciting
candidate! This paper focuses on a type of planet called hot Jupiters. These are gas giants that orbit so close to their stars that their year could be as little as a few days on Earth. Until recently, there wasn’t much evidence that a moon could exist in a stable orbit around a planet like this. So the first thing these scientists did was use math to confirm moons could live there. And next, they proposed a way we could identify them. Drawing on earlier research, they suggested you could find some exomoons by looking for certain gases in their planets’ atmospheres. This idea is actually based on what researchers see with Jupiter and its third-largest moon, Io. Io has hundreds of active volcanoes that spew out lava, sulfur-based gases, and other elements — like sodium and potassium. And some of those compounds get incorporated into Jupiter’s upper atmosphere. That’s important. Because at least in our solar system, elements like sodium and potassium aren’t normally found in the upper atmospheres of gas giants. They only seem to get there through external sources — like volcanic moons. So, these astronomers hypothesized that if you detect either sodium or potassium around a hot Jupiter, it could have a moon like Io. This basic idea isn’t new, but these researchers were among the first to see if it applied to hot Jupiters. And as it turns out, it might. In their study, they looked at data from 14 of these planets, all of which had sodium or potassium signatures in their upper atmosphere. Then, they ran analyses and identified one that seems most likely to have a moon. It’s called WASP-49b, and is located 550 light-years away. If this finding is validated, it would be the first confirmed exomoon. But even if it’s not, this method is still a really creative way of studying objects that are super far from Earth. It combines the familiar things that are close to us with alien worlds hundreds of light-years from here! At this point, it’s unclear if this technique could be used to find moons like ours around planets like Earth. But hey: Maybe we’ll need even more creative methods to do that. There’s a lot to explore in space — which is part of the reason science fiction
is so fun. You get to think about what would happen if, say, a bunch of alien robots called Carl suddenly appeared on Earth. Okay, let me explain. About a year ago, Hank, who co-hosts this channel with me and started SciShow and does lots of cool things, released a book that he worked on forever called An Absolutely Remarkable Thing. And that book is now available in paperback, which is just so much more cozy to hold! So if space, robots, social media, or just the general state of humanity are
things you’re interested in… you can pick up
the paperback of An Absolutely Remarkable Thing wherever you like to get your books. [OUTRO ♪]

Comments

  1. Post
    Author
  2. Post
    Author
    Levi Strauss

    I remember this being behind schedule since I was in highschool.
    Probably would have been faster to start from the drawing board again.

  3. Post
    Author
    Paul Newfield - Pasadena, CA. USA

    So we’re spending billions on some bullsh!t hypothetical science fiction telescope, that hasn’t been tested yet, to search for moons orbiting Jupiter like planets? FOR WHAT? Aren’t the scientific impossibilities of “spontaneous generation”, “abiogenesis”, & “evolution” blindly accepted throughout the scientific community? So then, what else are scientists hoping to discover by throwing TRILLIONS of dollars into space?

  4. Post
    Author
  5. Post
    Author
  6. Post
    Author
  7. Post
    Author
    Chef C

    James Webb has to have so many things fall perfectly in place to make this a successful mission. I commend all the engineers and scientists who are taking this expensive expensive expensive risk.

  8. Post
    Author
    Marc’s Fx

    Launch won’t happen until 2022/23 due to a lack of people waiting has dropped because they’ve forgotten all about it..

  9. Post
    Author
  10. Post
    Author
  11. Post
    Author
  12. Post
    Author
  13. Post
    Author
  14. Post
    Author
  15. Post
    Author
    S Wms

    It’s taken so long that Before it goes up they will have to tear it apart to upgrade some of the computer hardware then rewrite the software to work with the new hardware . Then they’ll need more upgrades as technology is moving soo much faster than they are building it

  16. Post
    Author
    dan fg

    They should totally send a remote controlled humanoid robot along with it to fix anything in case, you know, the images are blurred.

  17. Post
    Author
  18. Post
    Author
    Element Zero

    Yay!!! Now… let’s get Jimmy up in orbit! It’s dorky but I’ve been excited about the Webb scope/Hubble replacement since 2010. Hubble gave us the Deep Space images that are mind blowing.. have a feeling that the Webb is going to do great things for astronomy. Hopefully nasa makes sure the mirrors aren’t jarred after deployment into orbit <Hubble’s launch.. anyone remember that “Ooops..”> ?

  19. Post
    Author
  20. Post
    Author
  21. Post
    Author
  22. Post
    Author
    Gregory Thoman

    Waste of money. This thing is so far over budget it should have been scrapped years ago. There is a point in any project when the costs outweigh the benefits.

  23. Post
    Author
    NorthernChev

    We need just ONE more Space Shuttle mission. Because the Hubble Telescope has turned out to be a significant entity in the history of humankind. That thing belongs in a museum for future generations to remember!

  24. Post
    Author
  25. Post
    Author
  26. Post
    Author
  27. Post
    Author
  28. Post
    Author
  29. Post
    Author
  30. Post
    Author
  31. Post
    Author
  32. Post
    Author
  33. Post
    Author
  34. Post
    Author
  35. Post
    Author
    Anthony Paull

    Pretty sure if the launcher for the JWST fails it will be the most tragic event in space flight excluding those with human casualties. This telescope is vital. Can't wait!

  36. Post
    Author
    Joseph A

    How does a moon orbit a planet outside of a solar system? Wouldn't it just be taken by something with a stronger gravitational pull? Sounds pointless imo

  37. Post
    Author
  38. Post
    Author
  39. Post
    Author
    Eliah Macheza

    I am so afraid of dying before JWST beam results of its findings. I see it unravelling the mysteries of the universe. I can't afford to miss this by dying.

  40. Post
    Author
  41. Post
    Author
  42. Post
    Author
  43. Post
    Author
    Eluminary Xarrais

    They can't let it launcher will find out about the 👽's … seriously though when I clicked this video I thought it launched 10 years ago… Then found out it was actually supposed to launch 12 years ago

  44. Post
    Author
  45. Post
    Author
    texxtrek

    I gave up waiting on this thing years ago, and definitely know not to believe that any planned activity concerning the JWST will ever go as planned. Something ALWAYS goes wrong. Some five cent part will fail that will require the entire thing be taken apart and reassembled, adding another five years to the projected launch date. It's never anything trivial. And who here would be the tiniest bit surprised if it was destroyed in a car crash on the way to the launch pad? Or if its launch vehicle blew up? Or if it made it to space only to find out the mirrors won't unfold? Or that its radio won't work? Or whatever catastrophe will make 20 years of waiting a waste of time.

  46. Post
    Author
    Bruce Wayne

    The fact that NASA named this telescope after a known homophobe who actively helped ruin the careers of LGBT scientists and civil servants is unconscionable. The name choice feels like a curse on the project since it as experienced multiple delays, 12 years and counting.

  47. Post
    Author
  48. Post
    Author
    6thUser

    Please slow down the narration, it's hard to listen and don't edit the video so the next sentence starts immediately after the previous. This is verbal bombardment and it's not pleasant. Other than that I really like the show, keep up the good work.

  49. Post
    Author
  50. Post
    Author
    Soulkeeper

    OMG why not cut your speech even shorter on top of the other no time to let it sink in there is a reason people have an air brake while talking not only for air

  51. Post
    Author
  52. Post
    Author
  53. Post
    Author
  54. Post
    Author
    Jim Johnson

    It's not really a successor in that Hubble imaged in UV, visible and near-infrared light. Webb is optimized for thermal infrared. These thermal wavelength are blocked by our atmosphere. With adaptive optics earthbound telescopes can equal or exceed Hubble.

  55. Post
    Author
  56. Post
    Author
    01Fratricide

    WOW, Go figure @1:23 "Heat is a big source of Inferred Radiation" LOL. the SUN is the source of the Heat. Heat is not a source of IR

  57. Post
    Author
  58. Post
    Author
    Rome Salas

    I wonder if this James Webb Space Telescope can find that illusive ninth planet (Not Nibiru Planet X) but the one some think exists. (If there is such a planet).

  59. Post
    Author
    Patt 2018

    James webb telescope is like a war, we have lost a lot off good man along the way and so much time waiting for this thing to be launched .

  60. Post
    Author
    Malzahar Kassadin

    How hyped naive people are…They wont say nothing they already haven't said.New planets wth possible life,ufos,aliens,space stations and everything else that's actually interesting.

  61. Post
    Author
    Gerard Fraser

    This is awesome,do not crash.Also there are trillions of suns/plants/moons/blackholes and life everywhere,hope I am still alive when life is detected at least.

  62. Post
    Author
    ThinkingOutLoud

    Just remember, once it’s launched, we no longer have the shuttles to go up and repair it.
    You’ve had more than enough time and money to get it right the first time.

  63. Post
    Author
  64. Post
    Author
    Aaron Johnson

    The amazing James Web – White Elephant. Its a project that became too big to fail. This damn thing has sucked NASA's programs dry. I really have begun to hate this program.

  65. Post
    Author
  66. Post
    Author
  67. Post
    Author
  68. Post
    Author
    prizmprizn

    Get it into space..powered up and working..then I'll cheer…of course I'll be dead by then…and be omnipotent…lol jk but I prob will be dead.

  69. Post
    Author
  70. Post
    Author
  71. Post
    Author
    JaeKiDd 1k subs I will restart channel up again

    I sware we already found exo moons unless I was lied to by top scientist which it wouldn't be a 1st

  72. Post
    Author
  73. Post
    Author
  74. Post
    Author
  75. Post
    Author
  76. Post
    Author
  77. Post
    Author
    Evan Koch

    imagine the kinds of telescopes (and other things) we could have if NASA and SETI and any other space study organizations had even one tenth the budget the military has.

  78. Post
    Author
    Evan Koch

    bizarre that she mentioned SODIUM AND POTASSIUM. i have sodium (table salt) and potassium (in bananas) in my kitchen. Sugar and alcohol is sometimes in nebulas. So many of the daily life things that make up our regular world are really from space.

  79. Post
    Author
  80. Post
    Author
  81. Post
    Author
    PsychoMuffinSDM

    Video idea?: Why are they sending the James Webb telescope to L2 and not a sun synchronous orbit? What are the pros and cons of each?

  82. Post
    Author
  83. Post
    Author
    Jon Roberts

    Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash, Please don’t crash, please don’t crash,.

    Please.

  84. Post
    Author
    Luke Gray

    After the JWDST is operating, would it be cheaper/quicker/make sense to launch like 10 more to increase our work rate and field of view? I feel like NASA put forth all of this intellectual investment to only put out 1.

  85. Post
    Author
  86. Post
    Author
  87. Post
    Author
    Sam Brewer

    Between launch and the 10k things that need to happen for it to get into its complicated orbit ill be very surprised if JW even makes it. And no way to get to it. Wow. Need to get on with it and the next 5 space telescopes. Great vid

  88. Post
    Author
  89. Post
    Author
  90. Post
    Author
    Deathbreach

    Exomoon huh? What do you think you’ll find there? Poisoning gases and a waste of time? I thought we were looking for life on other worlds lol

  91. Post
    Author
  92. Post
    Author
    Bridventure PR

    For Pete's sake, take a breath give a pause, between sentences! I know you've edited the video in this way to cram as much sound in your 5 mins, but … 😁

  93. Post
    Author
  94. Post
    Author
    Ineke

    Great topic… now a better one… where is the guy with the great voice? Is he no longer working with this channel and if not what channel is he with?

  95. Post
    Author
    SpacialKatana

    Every single piece of the launch vehicle is going to be checked about a million times over by a lot of very, very paranoid people :/

  96. Post
    Author
  97. Post
    Author
    Jack black

    All this effort and god knows resources should of been used to find what we need not what we already have. It’s like the diamonds we detected that are too deep to get.

  98. Post
    Author
  99. Post
    Author
  100. Post
    Author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *