Introduction – Human-centred design workshop

Introduction – Human-centred design workshop


– [Isabella] Hello everyone,
and welcome to our workshop on human-centered design. Before we begin, we
would like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land on which this video is recorded, and on which we are all gathered today, and pay our respects to Elders
past, present, and future. The purpose of this workshop is to build NGOs’ capability to deliver
better client outcomes. We will do this by providing you with practical tools on how you can embed human-centered approaches into the design and delivery of your
programs and services. This workshop was commissioned by the Department of Finance,
Services and Innovation New South Wales. My name is Isabella Wallington and I’m the head of FutureGov Australia and I’ll be presenting this session. I’m an anthropologist by degree,
and following my studies, worked across federal government
agencies in Australia, predominantly in service delivery reform, and leading national programs in Indigenous strategy,
health, and welfare. From there I moved to FutureGov,
where I take my background in ethnographic research, and experience in understanding of the
government environment to work with public services
of all types and sizes, to improve service delivery
through digital transformation and user-centered design. This is what we will be going
through in today’s session. In the first part of the workshop, we will look at how to stay relevant to users in the 21st century, why practicing human-centered
design improves outcomes, and I’ll be presenting some
theory on design thinking, and human-centered design
processes and research. Then we’ll use some
human-centered design tools in some guided activities. This will include using
tools to understand users, defining problem spaces within context, looking at why prototypes are so important for testing ideas early, and understanding the different types of
prototypes that you can use. Lastly, we will also share
with you some other tools that you can use to help
test your solutions. Before we continue, there will be a hands-on section of the workshop. For all of you participating
in the activities, you will need to print out these worksheets from the toolkit. You should print, preferably on A3, a copy of each one for
every person participating. You will also need some
post-its and markers. You can now pause this video to make sure you have all of the things you need. Let’s look at the objectives for today. No doubt many of you are
naturally client-centric in your everyday work,
given the types of roles that you have, and the
organizations that you work for. Our workshop takes that
knowledge and practice into consideration,
and aims to build on it by sharing with you the benefits of doing human-centered design
in a systematic manner. This systematic approach
will help to support capability development as covered by the New South Wales Government’s
NGO Benchmarking Model. It would also help you seek
other support and funding from government departments. We believe this human-centered
process will increase the success of your service delivery and improve outcomes for your clients. To give you some background on what we do, FutureGov is an organization that focuses on designing public
services to be effective and efficient in the digital age. We focus on working with the government, local, state, and
federal, and NGO sectors, mainly in Australia and the UK to improve public services for citizens. We have more than ten years of experience in taking human-centered
approaches to the design of services, business challenges,
and cultural contexts. We are made up of people with a wide range of skills and experience in
design, policy, and digital, from both private and public sectors. We have one purpose:
to help public services deliver better life outcomes to citizens and to make positive impacts. Many of you here would
have seen and experienced the significant impact
that 21st century services and technology have had on our lives. These are all services that
you would be familiar with, whether you’ve used them or not. We are definitely not saying that NGOs and government services
need to mirror these. But there are some lessons that we can learn from their success. Amazon is more than a
store selling things. It sells convenience and
variety with a click. Endless waiting time for taxis has been replaced by services
on demand through Uber. Most importantly, these services have a high client-engagement level and efficient business models. These services are flexible. They are personalized, and responsive. They not only meet people’s needs, they provide a seamless experience. In the NGO sector, we need to be flexible so that people can
easily reach out for help anywhere, and any time. We need to feel personalized, so that they feel welcomed and understood. And we need to be responsive, so that they can trust and feel supported. From our experience, it
is even more essential for public services and
NGOs to adopt this approach in order to effectively help those who are often the more vulnerable members of our community, and who may be dependent on free interventions for support and to achieve better life outcomes. As you may know, the New
South Wales Government is transitioning towards an outcomes-based contracting model. This means the government
wants you to focus on delivering and measuring outcomes, and to demonstrate to your
organizations’ capabilities towards continuous improvement in effective service
delivery for your clients. We know organizations that
deliver human services are client-centric by nature. The point of this
workshop is to provide you with the right tools to capture
and document information to be used as evidence for grants, and to support applications. The human-centered approach allows NGOs to continuously improve,
adapt to changing needs so that you can be as
effective as possible into the future through your
solutions in helping people. It is an opportunity to
influence the higher system including Government, as
it helps them to assess the needs of NGOs and of
the communities over time. On the next slide, we will
show you a good example of how human-centered design approaches contributed to measuring
positive outcomes. This is Casserole Club. It is a meal-sharing service
developed by FutureGov. We started off interviewing
potential cooks to understand their motivations and goals, and speaking with diners to discover their pain points and needs. We also co-designed with
potential cooks and diners to come up with solutions
to address concerns like food and safety issues. The outcome of this work includes
improved social inclusion and reducing malnutrition
among the elderly, as well as saving councils
from large investment in providing Meals on Wheels services. In our next video, you will learn about the secrets behind
good products and services.

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