CMS

CMS


The Context Management Specification,
CMS, began at Duke University as the Clinical Context Object Workshop,
or CCOW. It seeks to facilitate the integration
of diverse applications at the point of use. It does this by managing issues
such as the identity of a patient the user wants to view or
update via these applications. The identity of the user who
wants to access the applications. A moment in time around
which temporal data displays should be centered by
the applications and a particular patient encounter
that the user wants to review. The details are highly technical, but
you can get the general idea from this illustration where several applications
from different vendors are all centered around the same patient, at the same
time, for the same clinician. This is an ambitious but
potentially very important effort. Since clinicians commonly complain
about the time and effort involved to use many different systems that work in
different ways to manage their patients. Before moving on, I want to mention an interesting feature
of the SMART on FHIR app platform. This is called launch parameters. These provide some of the same
services as anticipated in CMS, as providers, patients, and
other users move about among FHIR apps. As shown here, these include
the identity of the patient, the current encounter being viewed,
links to other resource instances of interest with this patient, and even the
reason why the app is being launched. Here is an example of
a JSON-formatted version of one of the simplest FHIR resources,
the patient. It contains the basic demographic
information, such as name, birthdate and
the provider taking care of the patient. It also contains a patient ID that can
be used to unambiguously retrieve other clinical information. Look a bit more carefully and you’ll see that this patient is
actually our old friend, Marla.

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